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Locomotive details

HRL 1: Loch class 4-4-0: The loch class was introduced by David Jones in 1896 with a series of 15 engines. A further three were built in 1917 The class survived until 1947 all be it in rebuilt form. Locomotives with the original boiler survived until 1938. Further details can be found in Cormack & Stevenson’s book on HR locomotives published by the RCTS as well as P Tatlow’s book on HR locomotives published by OPC.

Thanks to P Tatlow and Alistair Wright for permission to reproduce their drawings throughout the site.

HRL 2: The Strath Class. The Straths were introduced by David Jones in 1892 and were a development of the Clde Bogie series of the Duke class. they were numbered from 89 to 100 and were also sometimes known as the Glen class. Withdrawls commenced in 1921 and were completed by 1930. Further details can be found in Cormack & Stevenson’s book on HR locomotives published by the RCTS as well as P Tatlow’s book on HR locomotives published by OPC.

HRL 3: The Duke class was introduced in 1874 and the first ten engines carried the numbers 60 to 69. They were followed by a further 7 engines built at Lochgorm from 1876 to 1888. Withdrawls began in 1907 with the last to go in 1923 A third series referred to as the Clyde Bogie series was built in 1886 with detail differences, covered by an additional fret for the boiler if requested. The withdrawls of these locomotives commenced in 1923 and the last went in 1930. Further details can be found in Cormack & Stevenson’s book on HR locomotives published by the RCTS as well as P Tatlow’s book on HR locomotives published by OPC.

  • HRL – 5: The fourth Duke of Sutherland desired a modern engine for his private train and asked David Jones to design and arrange for its construction. This was done in 1895 and the original livery was Dark Green with black lining double edged in gold. When overhauled in 1946 the engine was brightened up with a coat of green paint and the lining was altered in its layout. The locomotive was sold in 1949 and went to New Romney where it was exhibited until sold to a Canadian in 1965, then passed to a museum in British Columbia where it was until 2011. The coach and Dunrobin were purchased by Beamish Museum for its use.

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