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7mm Locomotives

Catalogue No.

Description

Price in £

HR7 - L 1

Jones “Duke” 4-4-0 (Includes the Clyde Bogie)

SOO

HR7 - L 2

Jones “LOCH” 4-4-0 (1895 &1916 series) (Includes tender chassis)

SOO

HR7 - L 3

Jones “Strath” 4-4-0

SOO

HR7 - L 4

Jones Big Goods 4-6-0 Locomotive body only

SOO

HR7 - L 5

Drummond Castle 4-6-0 Series 1 or 2 locomotive body only: No Fittings

SOO

HR7 - L 6

0-4-4T Dunrobin (Needs buffers, wheels, motor and gears)

£175.00

HR7 - L 7

Wee Ben (etches Only)

£130.00

HR7 - L8

4-4-0 Yankee Tank (Needs buffers, wheels, motor and gears

SOO

HR7 - L9

Drummond Dornoch 0-4-4Tank (Loco & Chassis)

£100.00

HR7- L10

Drummond Banking Tank 0-6-4T(Loco & Chassis)

£100.00

 

 

 

HR7 - LC 1

Jones “Duke” 4-4-0 Chassis (Loco and Tender)

SOO

HR7 -LC 2

Jones “LOCH” 4-4-0 chassis (Loco Only)

SOO

HR7 - LC 3

Jones “Strath” 4-4-0 Chassis (Loco and Tender)

SOO

HR7 - LC 4

Jones Big Goods 4-6-0 Locomotive chassis only

SOO

HR7 - LC 5 NEW

Drummond Castle 4-6-0 Locomotive chassis only: No Fittings

SOO

 

 

 

HR7 - LA 1

Jones etched fold up crosshead assembly

£2.00

HR7 - LA 2

Set of 8 wheels & 7 Dials (2 off)

£1.00

HR7 - LA 3

Jones etched boiler backhead

£4.00

 

 

 

HR7 - T 1

Jones Big Goods 4-6-0: Tender body and chassis

SOO

HR7 - T 2

Drummond Bogie Tender for Castle 4-6-0. This kit will also build the narrower Wee Ben/Barney tender

SOO

HR7 - L1: Jones “Duke 4-4-0 was introduced in 1874 and the first ten engines carried the numbers 60 to 69. They were followed by a further 7 engines built at Lochgorm from 1876 to 1888. Withdrawls began in 1907 with the last to go in 1923.  A third series referred to as the Clyde Bogie series was built in 1886 with detail differences, covered by an additional fret for the boiler. The withdrawls of these locomotives commenced in 1923 and the last went in 1930. The kit will require a chassis, wheels, motor, gears and all fittings of the builders choosing to complete. Suitable fittings are available in the Shedmaster /Laurie Griffin range. Click here for details

HR7 - L2 : Loch class 4-4-0: The loch class was introduced by David Jones in 1896 with a series of 15 engines. A further three were built in 1917 The class survived until 1947 all be it in rebuilt form. Locomotives with the original boiler survived until 1938. Further details can be found in Cormack & Stevenson’s book on HR locomotives published by the RCTS as well as P Tatlow’s book on HR locomotives published by OPC. The kit will require a chassis, wheels, motor, gears and all fittings of the builders choosing to complete. Suitable fittings are available in the Shedmaster/Laurie Griffin range. Click here for details

HR7 - L 3: The Strath Class. The Straths were introduced by David Jones in 1892 and were a development of the Clde Bogie series of the Duke class. they were numbered from 89 to 100 and were also sometimes known as the Glen class. Withdrawls commenced in 1921 and were completed by 1930. Further details can be found in Cormack & Stevenson’s book on HR locomotives published by the RCTS as well as P Tatlow’s book on HR locomotives published by OPC.The kit will require a chassis, wheels, motor, gears and all fittings of the builders choosing to complete. Suitable fittings are available in the Shedmaster/Laurie Griffin range. The Duke fittings will fit the Strath Click here for details

HR7 – L 4: The Jones Big Goods 4-6-0. Introduced in 1894 and built by Sharp Stewart in Glasgow, the locomotives were numbered consecutively from 103 to 117. When new they were allocated between Perth and Inverness sheds to haul the principal goods trains on the company’s metals.  The first withdrawl was in 1929, with the last one going from service in 1940. Fortunately one is still with us, for in 1934 the LMS preserved the class leader No 103. After returning to service in the 1950’s with Scottish Region of British Railways and appearing in film, No 103 was retired, in the 60’s) to Glasgow Transport Museum where it may still be seen.The kit will require a chassis, wheels, motor, gears and all fittings of the builders choosing to complete. Suitable fittings are available in the Shedmaster /Laurie Griffin range. Click here for details

HR7 – L 5: The design work was started under David Jones as a passenger equivalent of the Big Goods 4-6-0. In fact there are great similarities between the two chassis of the locomotives. The locomotives of the Castle Class were put into service by Jones’s successor Peter Drummond in 1900. The first 10 locomotives were delivered between 1900 and 1902 by Dübs. The locomotives were numbered from 140 to 149. 2 further locomotives numbered 30 and 35 were built in 1910/11 by the NBL. All these engines were Series 1 types.  In 1913, a further 4 engines were constructed with an extended smokebox and modified cab front and tender detail differences. These were numbered 26 to 29 and were known as series 2. The kit will require a chassis, wheels, motor, gears and all fittings of the builders choosing to complete. Suitable fittings are available in the Shedmaster /Laurie Griffin range. Click here for details

HR7 - LA1: Jones etched fold up crosshead assembly

HR7 - LA3 Jones Backhead and dials

HR7 - LA2 Dials and wheels as from this etch

An additional fret to construct the French version of the castle is available. This consists of a new footplate and cab as well as a selection of number plates for the Etat Syatem locomotives and those that survived to SNCF days. The cost of the French kit remains as the Highland version at a total of £150.00 for chassis, body, tender and new fret.

The fret can be made available as a single item. Please contact me for details.

Photograph courtesy of Lozian. (www.tourofkeith.co.uk)

  • HR7 - L 6: The fourth Duke of Sutherland desired a modern engine for his private train and asked David Jones to design and arrange for its construction. This was done in 1895 and the original livery was Dark Green with black lining double edged in gold. When overhauled in 1946 the engine was brightened up with a coat of green paint and 7mm Locomotivesthe lining was altered in its layout. The locomotive was sold in 1949 and went to New Romney where it was exhibited until sold to a Canadian in 1965, then passed to a museum in British Columbia where it was until 2011. The coach and Dunrobin were purchased by Beamish Museum for its use.

HR7 – L7: Built between 1898 and 1906 The Wee Bens proved their worth on the Keith and Wick lines from Inverness. All were originally coupled to 3000 gallon tenders. They were  reboilered by the LMS between 1927 and 1930 Thereby extending their lives. The kit won’t build this version. Unfortunately none are preserved.

HR7 – L8: The first two members of this class were built by Dübs in 1891 and the parts for a further three were in hand, for the Uruguay Great Eastern Railway, but delivery was never accepted. The Highland Railway trialled the two completed locomotives before purchasing them for use on branch lines. These were 101 and 102. The other three were assembled with minor modifications including wider side tanks and a higher boiler pressure. These were originally numbered 11,14,15. In 1898 – 1900 they were again renumbered, with 11 becoming 51, 14 becoming 54 and 15 becoming 52. Number 102 was rebuilt in 1906 with a larger Drummond boiler which the kit does not make.

HR7 – L9 The first three members of this class were built by Lochgorm Works in 1905 and the Remainder in 1906. The engines were not subject to great alterations in their lives apart from renumbering in Highland days The engines were painted in the plain Green livery of the railway. They were painted in unlined olive green with H R or The Highland Railway in full on the tank. Full details can be found in the register of Highland Railway liveries and in Cormack and Stevensons book on Highland Railway Locomotives Vol 2.

 

HR7- L10 The first four members of this class were built by NBL in 1909 and the Remainder in 1910,1911 and two in 1912. The engines were not subject to great alterations in their lives apart from renumbering in Highland days. Livery Details. The engines were painted in the plain Green livery of the railway. They were painted in unlined olive green with H R or The Highland Railway infull on the tank. Full details can be found in the register of Highland Railway liveries and in Cormack and Stevensons book on Highland Railway Locomotives Vol 2.

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